3D scanning with Kinect V2

Kinect V2 is the second version of the Kinect 360 which can also be used as a 3D scanner. I have tried both devices and I think the second version is the best solution: not only because of its technical characteristics, but owns the full compatibility with Windows 10. Using an official Windows App, called 3D Scan, we can transfom our Kinect V2 into a 3D scanner!

Minimum requirements to use Kinect V2

  • 64-bit (x64) processor
  • Dual-core 3.1 GHz (2 logical cores per physical) or faster processor
  • 4 GB RAM
  • Nvidia CUDA graphic card or a Kinect Fusion compatible GPU
  • A compatible USB 3.0 port (Intel or Renesas chipset)

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The first thing you need to know is there are two ways to connect Kinect V2 on PC. You can buy the official adapter (it costs about 50 Euro) or you can modify your Kinect V2 to works with an unofficial method. I have tried the second method and I can assure you that it works perfectly and it’s very cheap. 

How to mod Kinect V2 – What we need?

  • TS10 Torx Security Bit
  • USB 3.0 “A” to “B” Adapter
  • Soldering
  • Power supply 12V 3A 

Now you have to open your Kinect V2 and solder 12V on pin 10 and GND on the pin to the left. I suggest you this video, which has helped me a lot. Once you have finished the work, close your Kinect V2. The result should be something like this:

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Kinect V2 – After the connection

Now connect Kinect V2 and download the last driver from device management, then download SDK 2.0 to test the device. If you want to use Kinect as a 3D scanner you also need to download 3D Scan and open it to start scanning!

As I said at the top of this article, Windows 10 is full compatible, so you can use “Windows Hello” to recognize your face to start your PC! Search on the Windows Store to find others compatible apps!

windows-hello-setup-screen-2

After many attemps the result is this, not bad!

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CO-CO2 Sensor v.2

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Have you ever felt tired, weak or asphyxiated? Maybe there are many people in a small place? If your answer is affirmative, the most probably cause is the Carbon Dioxide. This gas isn’t toxic but, at high concentrations, it makes you less productive (there are many studies and researches about this). I have noticed this problem when I was at school and I decided to solve it. This sensor can tell you when there is an excessive level of CO2 in your classroom, or in your office. At this point, to solve the problem, you can open the windows for a few minutes and change of air (ideal would be a ventilation system). In this article, I’m going to show you how to construct this sensor with Arduino for a minimal cost.

This is the second version of a my previous project. It’s more complex but it’s more complete than the first. The most important changes are: the add of an OLED display, the Carbon Monoxide Sensor (toxic gas that derivates from incomplete combustions), the ventilation system and the possibility to record data. I have recorded the CO2 PPM in my classroom and this is the result. When we have opened the windows, the values have decresed until 400 PPM. Thanks to the RTC module, we know the time of a determined record.

5lsa_co2concentration.png

What we need?

  • Arduino Mega (another Arduino doesn’t have enough memory for the libraries)
  • MQ7 CO sensor
  • RTC module (Date, hour and temperature)
  • 2 switches
  • 1 button
  • Fan 5V 30mm
  • Micro-SD module
  • Power bank (suggested)
  • OLED display
  • Wires for connections
  • Yellow and red leds
  • 220 Ohm Resistors
  • 3D printer (optional)
  • HC-06 Bluetooth module (optional)
  • 3D files at this link
  • Libraries at this link
  • Arduino code: Under revision

In normal conditions, and outside, the level is nearly to 400 ppm (but, unfortunately, it is increasing rapidly as you can see on this website). The level of 1500 PPM can be considered a threshold value for work and concentration, then it is impossible to work to fullest potential (efficiency decrease about 50%) . Furthermore, the 3d printer is optional because you can make the case with another material. For those who want to print it, I suggest them to print with PLA.

To calibrate the CO sensor you can read the value near a car exhaust pipe (where there are about 60 PPM). Over this threshold value, a buzzer will sound acoustic signals.

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For the code, you should download the library and replace the value with the current atmosphere ppm level (look up here). Then upload the code that I had shared, also changing here the current value. However, I added a mini-tutorial inside the code. If you are interested about how the MQ135 sensor works, you can visit the website of Davide Gironi.

You can download all the files from Thingiverse from the link in the list… I wait you for the next tutorial!

I hope I was helpful and clear in the description, any clarification or suggestion is welcome. Thanks for reading the article!

CO2 Sensor, for your concentration!

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Have you ever felt tired, weak or asphyxiated? Maybe there are many people in a small place? If your answer is affirmative, the most probably cause is the Carbon Dioxide. This gas isn’t toxic but, at high concentrations, it makes you less productive (there are many studies and researches about this). I have noticed this problem when I was at school and I decided to solve it. This sensor can tell you when there is an excessive level of CO2 in your classroom, or in your office. At this point, to solve the problem, you can open the windows for a few minutes and change of air (ideal would be a ventilation system). In this article, I’m going to show you how to construct this sensor with Arduino for a minimal cost.

 

What we need?

  • Arduino Nano
  • Breadboard (400 points)
  • MQ135 air-quality sensor (here the library)
  • Wires for connections
  • Yellow and red leds
  • 220 Ohm Resistors
  • 3D printer (optional)
  • HC-06 Bluetooth module (optional)
  • 3D files at this link
  • You can do anything without the Arduino code! Download it here

As you can see, I added a bluetooth module to the sensor. It is optional but with it you can look up the PPM (Parts Per Million) level with your Android smartphone. I’m sorry for Apple users… 😉

b3b99ecec2eb0a34c824227c2f8d1037_preview_featured.jpg

In normal conditions, and outside, the level is nearly to 400 ppm (but, unfortunately, it is increasing rapidly as you can see on this website). The level of 1500 PPM can be considered a threshold value for work and concentration, then it is impossible to work to fullest potential (efficiency decrease about 50%) . Furthermore, the 3d printer is optional because you can make the case with another material. For those who want to print it, I suggest them to print with PLA.

 

ELETRONICS AND CASE

Don’t worry about the electronics, if you are a beginner with Arduino, you should see the wiring diagram to understand how this sensor works and all the connections I have made. I also shared the Arduino code so you can immediately start monitoring your “emissions”.

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Actually, you should use 220 Ohm resistors for the leds, that I have forgotten them on the wiring diagram. You can also see that I have used some magnets and cents to hold the face to the case. For the code, you should download the library and replace the value with the current atmosphere ppm level (look up here). Then upload the code, that I had shared, on Arduino, also changing here the current value. However, I added a tutorial on the code that I had shared. If you are interested about how the sensor works, you can visit the website of Davide Gironi.

You can download all the files from Thingiverse from the link in the list … I wait you for the next tutorial!

 

I hope I was helpful and clear in the description, any clarification or suggestion is welcome. Thanks for reading the article!